Eye pathology case 9

Evisceration of a blind eye with multiple previous operations Evisceration specimens usually include the cornea (with a scleral rim) as well as the intraocular content. In contrast to enucleations, the tissue is disrupted by the surgery. This can make it difficult to recognise anatomic structures, especially as there is often scarring and disorganisation due to… Continue reading Eye pathology case 9

Eye pathology case 8

Cornea from an elderly female with gradually deteriorating vision Corneas make up a significant proportion of our workload. Most of our corneal specimens fall into four categories: endothelial failure, dystrophies, infections or interference with vision (eg scarring or ectasia). This specimen is full thickness cornea, with the epithelium on the right and endothelium on the… Continue reading Eye pathology case 8

Eye pathology case 7

Enucleation specimen. Intractable raised intraocular pressure due to an iris mass. This is a low power view of the anterior segment (cornea, anterior chamber, iris, ciliary body and a piece of lens). The section is off-centre, and so the iris is continuous rather than having a central gap where the pupil is. The iris is… Continue reading Eye pathology case 7

Eye pathology case 6

Biopsy from a young adult with an orbital mass and pain For those of you sitting exams (whether ophthalmologists or histopathologists), this is a classic pattern to recognise. It shows cribriform ("sieve-like") architecture, sometimes compared to Swiss cheese for obvious reasons. There are nests of basaloid tumour cells containing punched-out cystic spaces filled with mucin.… Continue reading Eye pathology case 6